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June 5, 2003 - 11:00pm

Linda Ritter New Development Director at Arizona Arthritis Center

Linda Ritter New Development Director at Arizona Arthritis Center

Linda A. Ritter, MBA, who has extensive experience in fund-raising, marketing and communications in health care and social service arenas, has been appointed development director at the Arizona Arthritis Center at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. (She replaces Carol Willson, who recently retired from the Center.)
Since 1999, Ritter served as vice president of communications and fund development at Jewish Family & Children's Service. Among other duties, she planned and directed fund-raising programs, managed communications and worked closely with its board of directors. From 1996-99, she was manager of marketing and communications for Carondelet Health Network, where she planned, organized and directed marketing and communications activities for community-focused health services and developed and implemented award-winning advertising and promotional campaigns, among other activities. Before that, she was magnet program marketing specialist for Tucson Unified School District, where she developed and implemented recruitment strategies for magnet programs.

Ritter earned an MBA from Northern Arizona University and bachelor's degree from State University of New York, Oswego, N.Y.

"As the development director for the Arizona Arthritis Center, I will seek to expand fund-raising efforts, especially in the Phoenix area," Ritter says, "and seek to increase overall endowment, with emphasis on endowed chairs. I also will work with the Southern Arizona Home Builders Association (SAHBA) and other special friends of the Center to support yearly fund-raising and outreach efforts."

A Center of Excellence at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, the Arizona Arthritis Center is committed to both patient care and research to improve the quality of life for people living with arthritis. In 2001, it was ranked as one of the top 50 centers for rheumatology in the United States, according to a U.S. News and World Report survey.